200px-Dog_in_animal_shelter_in_Washington,_Iowa

Shelter for homeless animals

Breeds are usually categorized by the functional type from which the breed was developed. The American Foxhound is known to originate from the states of Maryland and Virginia, and is the state dog of Virginia.[1] Though there has long been a rumor that the new breed was originally used for hunting Indigenous peoples of the Americas, this is not true. By the 1920s the English and American varieties of Cocker had become noticeably different and in 1946 the AKC recognised the English type as a separate breed. In some cases, a breed's origin overlaps the boundaries of two or more countries; the dog is normally listed only in the country with which it is most commonly associated (for example, by its designated country according to the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI). The basic types are companion dogs, guard dogs, hunting dogs, herding dogs, and working dogs, although there are many other types and subtypes.

Truman. This is actually one reason that this breed does not do well in city settings. The word cocker is commonly held to stem from their use to hunt woodcock in England, while spaniel is thought to be derived from the type's origins in Spain.

Yet, although several programs are undergoing to promote pet adoption, less than a fifth of the owned dogs come from a shelter.. Most show hounds are Walkers, many of the pack hounds (used with hunting foxes on horseback) are Penn-Marydel and hunters use a variety of strains to suit their hunting style and quarry. While the goal of the breed was originally to produce a working farm utility dog that could catch and hold wild boar and cattle, kill vermin, and guard an owner's property, when properly trained, exercised and socialized, this breed can become a great family pet. Despite its name, the Staffordshire Terrier was first bred in the nineteenth century in Birmingham, West Midlands, rather than in the English county of Staffordshire where it was then later bred. Dogs have been selectively bred for thousands of years, sometimes by inbreeding dogs from the same ancestral lines, sometimes by mixing dogs from very different lines.[1] The process continues today, resulting in a wide variety of breeds, hybrids, and types of dog. In addition, there are some marked differences between it and its English relative. Most show hounds are Walkers, many of the pack hounds (used with hunting foxes on horseback) are Penn-Marydel and hunters use a variety of strains to suit their hunting style and quarry. The breed was first recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1886. These dogs remained in the Brooke family for nearly 300 years.